HAVE A LOOK AT BUILDING CONSERVATION SERVICES RECENT PROJECTS OVER THE YEARS

OCTOBER 2019

Latest update from ongoing site works. Derelict Devon farmhouse following near collapse, now nearing complete refurbishment, employing a sensitive conservation lead repair programme.

MAY 2019

Wessex Conservation Company Ltd have completed undertaking repair works to Kingdon House Community Association's former printing works. Located within the Tamar Valley & Tavistock UNESCO World Heritage Site, the works have been part funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund & the Greater Dartmoor Leaf Company.

APRIL 2019

Local Firm, W J Avery commence refurbishment works to grade II listed 3 Market Street, part funded by the National Heritage Lottery Fund.

NOVEMBER 2018

Wessex Conservation Company Ltd have begun undertaking repair works to Kingdon House Community Association's former printing works.

OCTOBER 2017

9 High Street, Torrington, winner of the restoration category at the Devon Historic Buildings Trust Awards 2017.

SEPTEMBER 2017

BCS project, 9 High Street, Torrington, has been shortlisted for the Devon Historic Buildings Trust Awards 2017.

MARCH 2017

Building Conservation Services secure a grant of £84,000 through the Heritage Lottery Funded, Tavistock Townscape Initiative, located within the UNESCO Cornwall and West Devon Mining Landscape World Heritage Site, for the repair and conservation of a prominent town centre Grade II listed historic property

FEBRUARY 2017

Sam Percival accepted on to The Diocese of Truro list of approved Quinquennial Church Inspectors

JUNE 2016

Building Conservation Services designed Mike Wye Training Centre opens

JANUARY 2016

BCS wins two projects within the Tavistock World Heritage Site preparing bids for Heritage Lottery funded repairs to two grade II listed properties.

MAY 2016

Sam Percival accepted on to the Exeter Diocese list of approved church inspectors

FEBRUARY 2015

Sam Percival has been accepted by the RICS on to their list of Conservation Accredited Surveyors

JULY 2014

RICS Published article by Sam Percival on the effects of water ingress on cob walling

HIGHLY COMMENDED - RICS AWARD FOR 12 BUDE STREET

Dramatic Job!

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Dramatic cob wall failure: a result of water ingress combined with a thick layer of cement render. Fortunately, the Client was warned of the imminent threat by BCS and moved out of the living spaces 4 days before the collapse.

Contact Building Conservation Services if you need our help with a dramatic job such as the property in the images below, we'd love to help!

THE IMPORTANCE OF LIME MORTARS

In the past there has been a considerable amount of harmful building work carried out to traditional vernacular buildings, not least of which has been the use of cement-based mortars and renders. Solid walled masonry structures, including cob, remain dry on the principle that any damp ingress that does occur is freely allowed to evaporate back out. Lime mortars remain relatively permeable after setting and therefore provide uninhibited drying-out. In the past cement mortars were used on damp buildings in the belief that they would stop the wet getting in. This can sometimes cause the opposite effect: Cement is a rigid material prone to cracking as a result of expansion and contraction caused during periods of atmospheric temperature variation. Through capillary action water can pass through the fine cracks and then spread throughout the wall. After a cement rendered wall becomes damp the moisture is unable to evaporate out and instead can begin to migrate inwards, often leading to damp internal walls. If a cob wall becomes excessively damp it can, in some instances, lose its structural integrity and the wall can become prone to sudden and catastrophic collapse, an example of which is shown above.

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CONTACT BUILDING CONSERVATION SERVICES FOR HISTORIC BUILDING REPAIRS

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